PERCEPTUAL MECHANISMS FOR REPLACING OLD WORDS AND ADAPTING NEW WORDS: ESTABLISHING A CROSS-TALK BETWEEN WORD REPLACEMENT AND CODE-SWITCHING IN ODIA

  • Shashikanta Tarai Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, NIT Raipur, India
Keywords: Lexical replacement, adaptation, borrowed words, semantic paradigm

Abstract

This paper presents an investigation on how a decrease in perception determines the replacement of underuse old words, and the increase of perception manifests the adaptation of overuse new words. A relationship between lexical replacement and code-switching is established by examining the perceptual mechanisms of lexical adaptation in Odia. To test lexical adaptation in terms of perceptual rate, a psycholinguistic experiment on old Sanskrit tatsam and their semantic-equivalent English-borrowed words was conducted by using semantic-priming paradigm. Target words that were associated either positively and negatively with preceding Odia and English priming-words were presented in Odia orthography. Odia-English bilingual speakers were asked to comprehend the positive and negative association between target and priming words, and to respond by pressing left arrow-key for positive and right arrow-key for negative meaning. Measuring perceptual facilitation for adaptation and code-switching in terms of response time (ms), results show that disyllabic English-borrowed words are processed faster than their equivalent disyllabic Sanskrit-tatsam words. English negative priming words facilitate the processing of disyllabic Sanskrit-tatsam words, suggesting faster code-switching effect from English to Odia. Odia-English bilingual speakers have a tendency to adapt English disyllabic words in the place disyllabic Sanskrit-tatsam words, preserving the minimal disyllabic word structure of Odia.      

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Published
2019-07-30
How to Cite
Tarai, S. (2019). PERCEPTUAL MECHANISMS FOR REPLACING OLD WORDS AND ADAPTING NEW WORDS: ESTABLISHING A CROSS-TALK BETWEEN WORD REPLACEMENT AND CODE-SWITCHING IN ODIA. Proceeding of the International Conference on Arts and Humanities, 4(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.17501/icoah.2017.4101