CAPITAL UTILIZATION AND HAPPINESS OF LABOUR MIGRANT HOUSEHOLDS, THAILAND

  • Wanichcha Narongchai Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Labour and International Migration Service Center, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Thailand
  • Dusadee Ayuwat Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Labour and International Migration Service Center, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Thailand
  • Adirek Rengmanawong Khon Kaen Provincial Health Office, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand
Keywords: Capital utilization, Capital, Livelihoods, Happiness, Labour Migrant Households

Abstract

This study tried to compare the differences of capital utilization and happiness of labour migrant households in the Northeast, Thailand by some characteristics. The research used the quantitative methodology. Samples of the research were random from the households engaging in international migrants within a year at Chaiyaphum Province – the Provinces in the region with the highest international migrant of 334 households. The research instrument, the interview schedule, was reliable at 0.913 levels. The data were collected during July, 2017 and analyzed based on descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA for hypothesis testing.  The result indicated that the extended family had a significance capital utilization level and happiness level more than single family and skipped family at level 0.05. The household with both male head households and lalours had significance capital utilization level and happiness level more than others and also found that the household with both female head households and lalours had the lowest of capital utilization level and happiness level. The households with the remittance more than 940 US$ had a significance capital utilization level and happiness level more than others at level 0.05.  The results also indicated that the households with high investment from the remittance had a significance capital utilization level and happiness level more than others at level 0.01.

References

Aronson et al., 2007, Definitions and Rationale. In:Restoring natural capital: science, business, and practice, edited by J. Aronson, S. J. Milton, and J. Blignaut. (Washington, D.C., USA.: Island Press).

Arvin, B. M., and Lew, B., 2002, Do happiness and foreign aid affect bilateral migrant remittances?. Journal of Economic Studies, 39(2), 212-230.

Ayuwat, D., 2006, Migration: Subsistence for Happiness of Isan Households. Humanities and Social Sciences Journal, 23(2), 80-111.

Ayuwat, D., Im-emtham, S. and Teerawisit, A., 2010, Lifestyles of Thai Laborers in Taiwan: A Study in the Destination Country. Humanities and Social Sciences Journal, 27(1), 1-28.

Ayuwat, D. and Chamaratana, T., 2014, The role of labour broker networks in setting the price of working abroad for Thai migrant workers. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, 28(2), 51-68.

Bourdieu, P. and Wacquant, L., 1992, An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.)

Chami, R., Fullenkamp, C. and Jahjah, S., 2005, Are immigrant remittance flows a source of capital for development?. IMF Staff Papers, 52, pp. 55-81.

College of Demography, Chulalongkorn University, 2011, Migration, Date of access: 15/06/2017.http://www.cps.chula.ac.th/research_division/basic_data/b_ migration.html.

Department of Mental Health, Ministry of Public Health, 2007, Thai Happiness Indicators, Date of access: 16/06/2017. http://www.dmh.go.th/test/qtest/

Frankenberger, T., Drinkwater, M., Maxwell, D., 2000, Operationalizing household livelihood security: A holistic approach for addressing poverty and vulnerability program document. (Atlanta, USA.: CARE).

Goodwin, R. D., 2006, Association between coping with anger and feeling of depression among youths. American Journal of Public Health, 4 (96), 664-669.

Katewongsa, P., 2017, Living Arrangement and the Well-being of rural Households in Thailand. Journal of Population, 5(1), 107-130.

Komjakraphan, P. and Chansawang, W., 2016, The Lived Experience of Living in Skipped-Generation Household among Southern Thai Elders. Songklanagarind Journal of Nursing, 35(3), 35-56.

Markova, E. 2010.Effects of migration on sending countries: lessons from Bulgaria. Hellenic Observatory papers on Greece and Southeast Europe, GreeSE paper no. 35.

National Statistics Bureau, 2012, Executive Summary on Survey of Population Migration, 2012, Date of access: 14/06/2017. http://service.nso.go.th/nso/nsopublish/ service/survey/ MigrantExec51.pdf.

Narongchai, W., and Ayuwat, D., 2011, Patterns of Co-resident of Skipped-generation in Isan Migrant Family. Proceeding of The 5th Annual International Conference on Sociology, Greece, 9-12 May, pp. 60-80.

Office of Agricultural Economics., 2014, The Survey of Farmer’s Debt Burden. (Bangkok: KU – OAE Foresight Center, Office of Agricultural Economics. Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives).

Office of Overseas Employment Administration, Department of Employment, Ministry of Labor, 2013, First Quarter Situations of Cross-Regional Laborers 2013. Date of access: 13/06/2016. http://wvvw.msociety.go.th/article_attach/10412/15302.pdf.

Office of the Attorney General, 2014, Legal Problems of Thai People Living Abroad through Internet Vol.3. (Bangkok: V. Printing).

Office of the Royal Society, 2003, The 2002 Royal Institute Dictionary. (Bangkok: Nanmee Book Publishing).

Roscoe, John T., 1975, Fundamental Research Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.).

Sakdavekee-Isara, S., 2001, The Development of Well-being Indicators. Date of access: 15/10/2016. www.jvkk.go.th/research/qrresearch.asp?code=201440007341.

Thai Health Organization, 2007, Manual for 8 Happiness Items. (Bangkok: Thai Health Organization).

World Bank, 1995, Trends in Developing Economies 1995. (Washington, D.C, USA..: World Bank.)

Published
2018-05-31
How to Cite
Narongchai, W., Ayuwat, D., & Rengmanawong, A. (2018). CAPITAL UTILIZATION AND HAPPINESS OF LABOUR MIGRANT HOUSEHOLDS, THAILAND. Proceedings of the International Conference on Future of Women, 1(1), 22-29. https://doi.org/10.17501/icfow.2018.1103